Cathodoluminescence imaging on quartz in sandstone

How Does Correlative Microscopy Work?

Posted by Delmic on Apr 13, 2018 1:30:00 PM

Nowadays it has become crucial for life scientists to gain structural and functional data about the sample in order to understand the biological processes happening at the scale of the nanometer. Light or fluorescence microscopy made it possible for the researchers to detect the functional information and image different colors and parts of the cell. It provides the data to understand the dynamics of the cell, however, the diffraction limit of light doesn’t allow distinguishing objects that are smaller than the wavelength of light. That is when the life scientists turn to electron microscopy, which provides the structural information in a high resolution.

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Topics: correlative microscopy, SECOM, video, clem, correlative light electron microscope, microscopy solution, integrated clem, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, iclem, life science microscope, scanning electron microscope, correlative light and electron microscopy, clem video


Correlative light and electron microscopy on SECOM platform: benefits for the research

Posted by Delmic on Feb 21, 2018 2:44:38 PM

How can your research benefit from correlative light and electron microscopy? Why is this technique becoming increasingly attractive to many scientists in different fields of research? This is the main focus of the newest video, in which our application specialist Sangeetha Hari explains the main advantages of correlative light and electron microscopy on the SECOM, a unique microscopy solution for life sciences

 

 

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Topics: correlative microscopy, SECOM, video, clem, correlative light electron microscope, microscopy solution, integrated clem, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, iclem, life science microscope, scanning electron microscope, correlative light and electron microscopy, clem video


Potential of correlative light and electron microscopy for understanding Diabetes Type 1

Posted by Vera Lanskaya on Feb 19, 2018 11:59:04 AM

Diabetes Type 1, one of the two widely spread forms, is an autoimmune decease, which is caused by destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in pancreas. This type of Diabetes is called insulin-dependent: the body’s immune system attacks the beta cells located in the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, which normally maintain the blood sugar levels by producing the necessary amount of insulin. When the islets do not release the insulin, the amount of glucose in the blood builds up. This results in cells suffering and dying from the lack of glucose and high blood sugar levels, which makes multiple organs collapse and lead to coma and death.

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Topics: correlative microscopy, life sciences, SECOM, clem, correlative light electron microscope