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Possibilities of the SPARC for time-resolved cathodoluminescence

Posted by Delmic on Mar 13, 2018 9:19:40 AM

What is a time-resolved cathodoluminescence? How can it be applied in different fields? In the new video Toon Coenen, application specialist at Delmic, gives an explanation of this imaging technique.

 

Time-resolved cathodoluminescence is a technique in which you look at the time dynamics of the cathodoluminescence emission process.

To introduce time-resolved technique, Toon focuses on two main types of imaging: lifetime imaging (or emission decay) and g(2) imaging, which is also known in physics as second-order correlation function. He explains how these two techniques can be performed. Both of these techniques have a wide range of application and can be used in such fields as photonics, materials science, geology and even biology.

The SPARC is a high-performance cathodoluminescence detection system, which integrates these time-resolved acquisition methods. The modular design of the SPARC system provides different possibilities for imaging. Two optical modules, which are present in both SPARC spectral and SPARC compact, can be configurated for various detection functionalities and wavelength ranges. For instance, the second module can be used as a time-resolved detection system for g(2) and lifetime CL imaging. The modules are interchangable and provide a great flexibility for the research.

If you are interested in learning more about the SPARC system optical modules and their possibilities, we encourage you to download the technical note below:

sparc_optical modules.png

Technical Note: Optical modules in the
SPARC cathodoluminescence system

Topics: cathodoluminescence, SPARC, cathodoluminescence sem, video, cathodoluminescence video, time-resolved cathodoluminescence, optical modules