Cathodoluminescence imaging on quartz in sandstone

Integrated correlative light and electron microscopy: A new technique for geological materials

Posted by Delmic on May 3, 2018 3:00:00 PM

Integrated correlative light and electron microscopy (iCLEM) is a technique, in which both fluorescence imaging and electron imaging can be performed on one instrument without needing to transfer the sample. Correlative microscopy approach is being used worldwide for cancer research, in marine biology, neuroscience, and cell biology. Recently this technique has also been applied in the field of geology to gain an insight into the sedimentary organic matter in geological materials.

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Topics: correlative microscopy, Presentation, Geology, SECOM, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, iclem, scanning electron microscope, correlative light and electron microscopy, geological materials


How Does Correlative Microscopy Work?

Posted by Delmic on Apr 13, 2018 1:30:00 PM

Nowadays it has become crucial for life scientists to gain structural and functional data about the sample in order to understand the biological processes happening at the scale of the nanometer. Light or fluorescence microscopy made it possible for the researchers to detect the functional information and image different colors and parts of the cell. It provides the data to understand the dynamics of the cell, however, the diffraction limit of light doesn’t allow distinguishing objects that are smaller than the wavelength of light. That is when the life scientists turn to electron microscopy, which provides the structural information in a high resolution.

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Topics: correlative microscopy, SECOM, video, clem, correlative light electron microscope, microscopy solution, integrated clem, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, iclem, life science microscope, scanning electron microscope, correlative light and electron microscopy, clem video


Possibilities of the SPARC for time-resolved cathodoluminescence

Posted by Delmic on Mar 13, 2018 9:19:40 AM

What is a time-resolved cathodoluminescence? How can it be applied in different fields? In the new video Toon Coenen, application specialist at Delmic, gives an explanation of this imaging technique.

 

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Topics: cathodoluminescence, SPARC, cathodoluminescence sem, video, cathodoluminescence video, time-resolved cathodoluminescence, optical modules


Correlative light and electron microscopy on SECOM platform: benefits for the research

Posted by Delmic on Feb 21, 2018 2:44:38 PM

How can your research benefit from correlative light and electron microscopy? Why is this technique becoming increasingly attractive to many scientists in different fields of research? This is the main focus of the newest video, in which our application specialist Sangeetha Hari explains the main advantages of correlative light and electron microscopy on the SECOM, a unique microscopy solution for life sciences

 

 

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Topics: correlative microscopy, SECOM, video, clem, correlative light electron microscope, microscopy solution, integrated clem, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, iclem, life science microscope, scanning electron microscope, correlative light and electron microscopy, clem video


Potential of correlative light and electron microscopy for understanding Diabetes Type 1

Posted by Vera Lanskaya on Feb 19, 2018 11:59:04 AM

Diabetes Type 1, one of the two widely spread forms, is an autoimmune decease, which is caused by destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in pancreas. This type of Diabetes is called insulin-dependent: the body’s immune system attacks the beta cells located in the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, which normally maintain the blood sugar levels by producing the necessary amount of insulin. When the islets do not release the insulin, the amount of glucose in the blood builds up. This results in cells suffering and dying from the lack of glucose and high blood sugar levels, which makes multiple organs collapse and lead to coma and death.

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Topics: correlative microscopy, life sciences, SECOM, clem, correlative light electron microscope


3 outstanding advantages of the SPARC cathodoluminescence system (video)

Posted by Delmic on Jan 31, 2018 2:31:10 PM

In this short video about the SPARC our application specialist Toon Coenen talks about the main three advantages of this cathodoluminescence system. What are the possibilies of the SPARC and why cathodoluminescence is gaining poplarity in various scientific fields? Find out from the video!

 

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Topics: cathodoluminescence, SPARC, cathodoluminescence sem, video, cathodoluminescence video


An inside look at the department of Imaging Physics, TU Delft: The breeding ground for innovations in iCLEM

Posted by Delmic on Sep 28, 2017 4:29:42 PM

Understanding the relationship between structure and function in biology requires continuous developments in the field of microscopy. While electron microscopes and fluorescence microscopes have been go-to techniques for studying organic samples at a high resolution, individually they fall short in offering the exhaustive data needed for truly in-depth life science research.

In 2011, the Charged Particle Optics group at TU Delft completed the development of the SECOM. This system integrates a light and electron microscope, thus combining the labelling capabilities of fluorescence microscopy with the high-resolution nanoscale data obtained from electron microscopy. Six years later, the department of Imaging Physics houses no less than five SECOM systems.

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Topics: correlative microscopy, life sciences, microscopy, SECOM


Overcoming the challenges of light microscopy in the life sciences

Posted by Kaitlin van Baarle on Jun 15, 2017 4:16:55 PM

In order to make new discoveries in the life sciences, innovations need to be continuously made in microscopy. This way, scientists can take an ever-closer look at phenomena that are happening on a molecular scale.

Fluorescence microscopy is considered a reliable tool for studying organic samples at a high resolution. Nevertheless, the diffraction barrier of light poses the problem of not being able to distinguish objects that are smaller than the wavelength of light. Proteins, for example, can be as small as four nanometers. Even recent developments in light microscopy - such as super-resolution which can resolve objects at a smaller scale - come with the problem of providing no contextual or structural information besides the objects that glow under fluorescence.

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Topics: correlative microscopy, life sciences


Correlative microscopy: Opening up worlds of information with fluorescence

Posted by Kaitlin van Baarle on Jun 1, 2017 12:43:00 PM

Scientists of all fields are most certainly familiar with the miniature worlds unearthed by electron microscopy. From the complex structures of viruses to extremely small forensic evidence, the revelations brought about by this technology have led to enormous developments in the scientific world. The wavelength of fast electrons is significantly smaller than that of visible light, creating images that were previously unobtainable with conventional light microscopy. For life scientists in particular, the main advantage of electron microscopy (from here on referred to as EM) is the contrast that the black-and-white high-resolution images reveal, providing essential information on the structure of a cell, organelle, or organic tissue.

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Topics: correlative microscopy, life sciences


A high-performance cathodoluminescence system with one-of-a-kind features: The SPARC

Posted by Kaitlin van Baarle on Apr 10, 2017 3:22:02 PM

Characterization at the nanoscale is becoming increasingly important as new discoveries are made and structures are developed at smaller scales. Optical characterization alone is not sufficient to study materials at a scale smaller than the wavelength of light, and electron microscopy results in limited data. This is an issue faced by scientists in fields ranging from materials science to the geosciences. 

This is why DELMIC has developed the SPARC cathodoluminescence (CL) system, which is designed to fit on a scanning electron microscope and detect CL emission using any of available five imaging modes. The SPARC is unmatched in terms of its unique features and high performance, and is recommended for any researcher that wants to keep pace with the competitive scientific community.

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Topics: cathodoluminescence


Thoughts on the various applications, techniques, and complications to be discovered in the fascinating fields of both cathodoluminescence and correlative light and electron microscopy.

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